Tuesday, 24 November 2015
Dialectical Behavior Therapy Tips for a Happy Thanksgiving
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Thanksgiving is a time to appreciate the blessings in our lives.
At Renewal House, we have much to be grateful for this year. Our gratitude begins with you! With your support, we have assisted more than 65 families in their journey toward a new beginning, free of the trauma and chaos of addiction. In appreciation, we would like to share tips from our Dialectical Behavior Therapy program to ensure your family enjoys a happy and safe holiday season:

Aim for less stress rather than no stress. The spirit of the holidays can quickly fade amongst exceedingly long to-do lists and desires to create the perfect, stress-free holiday. To maintain the joyful spirit, set realistic expectations and attainable goals. Also, schedule time between errands and gatherings to rest and relax. If that moment includes a cup of hot cocoa, even better!

Be in the moment, completely. The best way to be present in the moment is to use your senses. Take in the smell of a pie baking or holiday-scented candle burning. Watch the lights blinking on a tree or their reflection in a beautiful package. Notice the way a soft blanket feels or the harmonic sound of family-chatter at the dinner table. Taking in these little things can make a big difference in how you experience the rush of activities in the holiday season.

Live gratefully. The holidays can evoke lots of emotions around what we should have, should buy, and should give. Find time to count your blessings and recognize that while you many not have all that you want, you have all that you need. Also, remember that spending time with your family of choice is more important than spending money.

From our collective family to yours, Happy Thanksgiving! 

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Posted on 11/24/2015 11:19 AM by Jennifer Wheeler
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Friday, 13 November 2015
Message from Commissioner E. Douglas Varney on Heroin's Grip in our Cities and Suburbs
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Heroin Abuse Is On The Rise In Tennessee, Leaving Lives In Ruins
Message from Commissioner E. Douglas Varney on Heroin's Grip in our Cities and Suburbs

It pains me to see so many Tennesseans hurting because they or a loved one is self- destructing due to a substance use addiction.  So  many  of  our  friends,  neighbors,  and colleagues have fallen victim to a habit that started innocently with prescription pain medicine and for many is now morphing into something far more sinister and dangerous.

Governor Haslam created an interdepartmental task force to fight the good fight on the prescription drug epidemic and to raise awareness about this issue. Increased awareness has been  fundamental  in  this  effort  and  we  are  now  seeing  a  decrease  in  the  amount  of prescription drugs that are available. New laws, more treatment, the full court press from state government, law enforcement and communities across Tennessee have been effective.

We've  managed  to  serve  thousands  of  our  fellow  Tennesseans  with  treatment  and recovery services. However, our research indicates that there are still many who are still dealing with active addiction.

We succeeded in making pain meds harder to get for those who do not need them legitimately, making them more abuse deterrent, and giving doctors more tools to monitor their patients who are prescribed pain medicine. These measures had the intended result in reducing availability, use and abuse.

As we forged efforts to reduce availability of opioid based pain remedies, in the shadows, heroin arrived on the scene. It arrived like a tidal wave in Tennessee. It's a far more potent form of opioids, cheaper, more dangerous and more lethal.

The demand for opioids has been most pronounced in our rural communities, while heroin is surfacing more in our major cities and suburbs.

I'm saddened to see our friends and neighbors that have been struggling with opioid addiction now transitioning to heroin which is coming from the criminal underground street dealer.

Our research data from multiple sources now shows heroin is sharply on the rise in Tennessee.

·     More people are seeking treatment for a heroin addiction in Tennessee

·     Drug seizures, criminal activity and arrests are increasing, mostly in urban areas

·     Heroin use is rapidly increasing as the abuse of pain meds is leveling off

Anyone interested in detoxing from opioids may encourage their medical provider to taper them off the medication. For additional information regarding tapering off of opioids patients may refer their medical provider to the following Tennessee Department of Health website: https://health.state.tn.us/Downloads/ChronicPainGuidelines.pdf

 

In addition, if you cannot get help from your medical provider, please call the Tennessee REDLINE anytime at 1-800-889-9789 to find treatment resources across the state.

The mission of the Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services is to plan for and promote the availability of a comprehensive array of quality prevention, early intervention, treatment, habilitation and rehabilitation services and supports based on the needs and choices of individuals and families served. For more information, visit www.tn.gov/behavioral-health.

For information and guidance on talking with a loved one who may be abusing heroin or to find substance use treatment resources across the state, call the Tennessee REDLINE anytime at 1-800-889-9789.

The mission of the Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services
is to plan for and promote the availability of a comprehensive array of quality prevention, 
early intervention, treatment, habilitation and rehabilitation services and supports 
based on the needs and choices of individuals and families served. 
For more information, visit www.tn.gov/behavioral-health.
 

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Posted on 11/13/2015 2:50 PM by Jennifer Wheeler
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